How to Choose the Right Home Siding

How to Choose the Right Home Siding
  • Opening Intro -

    Choosing the right siding for your home is as easy as considering wood, brick or vinyl, right?

    Well, no. If you live in an area of the country prone to extreme temperature variations throughout the year, then you need siding that can withstand what nature throws at your home.

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Cost effective siding need not bust your budget.

Choosing the right siding for your home is as easy as considering wood, brick or vinyl, right? Well, no. If you live in an area of the country prone to extreme temperature variations throughout the year, then you need siding that can withstand what nature throws at your home. New houses often come equipped with vinyl siding, but if you have an older home and are looking to update your home, then there are options for you to explore based on your budget, local climate conditions and style.

Budget

— Perhaps the biggest factor when choosing siding is what you can afford. Standard wood siding is reasonably priced as is vinyl siding. The former needs to be painted from time to time, the latter may need power washing and mildew removed as needed. Replacing the entire siding on your home is cheaper per plank than just one section, but consider replacing only some of the siding particularly if you’re already working with wood and brick.

Climate

— Hot, muggy climates can be a challenge to any home. In southern states, where wood rot is common, most new homes make extensive use of vinyl. Homeowners of older homes with wood siding will often vinyl over existing siding or replace with stone or brick facing. Fiber cement and stucco are popular in hot, dry climates and can be painted. Another popular option is James Hardie Siding that combines strength, beauty, and durability.

Maintenance

— Vinyl and brick may be among the easiest sidings to maintain, but all siding will have to be checked from time to time to ensure that there are no cracks, leaks or broken pieces. Repointing brick can be costly and take time, requiring you to chisel out loose mortar, brush out loose particles and apply new mortar. With some forms of siding, you can remove broken sections such a vinyl or aluminum pieces and snap in new siding. Wood siding, including redwood, cypress and cedar are more durable, but should be repainted or stained approximately once every five years.

Contractor

— Once you settle on the type of siding for your home, you’ll need to find the right contractor to get the job done. Deal with licensed contractors only and those with a certificate of insurance. Ask to see the license and the certificate when obtaining bids. Get at least three bids and ask each company to supply references. Check with these customers to ensure that they were happy with the work. Understand payment procedures such as down payment and payment in full. You’ll also want warranty information and whom to call in the event a problem arises. Lastly, find out if that warranty is transferrable to a new owner.

Some contractors offer financing for their work, but consider paying cash or tapping your home equity line to pay for these improvements. Keep your paperwork handy, because when it comes time to sell your home, you may need that information for tax purposes.

Home Improvement reference:

everything about home siding

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About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".