Guest Stay: How to Ready Your Home for Christmas Visitors

Guest Stay: How to Ready Your Home for Christmas Visitors
  • Opening Intro -

    'Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house, not a creature was stirring and your guests are sharing a couch…."

    Ugh!

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You knew that your home was short of room, but you didn’t expect that one or more of your guests would be consigned to the couch for their Christmas visit. While “couch surfing” may work for the teens in your home, for your other guests the very thought of occupying your sofa sends a shudder up and down your spine. Is it getting drafty in here?!

Fortunately, with some early planning on your part you can prepare your home for visitors this holiday season, but provided you take action immediately. And those renovations can include other updates that have little to do with guest sleeping arrangements.

1. Renovate the entranceway. Is your home welcoming? Or does it look as if it has been neglected? Short of painting or placing new siding on the exterior, your home entryway might benefit from a fresh coat of paint on the front door. Or, if that door is simply no longer efficient, why not replace it with a storm door? Consider adding a fresh coat of paint on the foyer walls or touching up the molding. Whatever looks tired, you can brighten with a coat of paint.

2. Kitchen refresh. Time is of the essence for a major kitchen renovation, but you can handle certain interim tasks that can give your most valuable room much sparkle in the shortest amount of time. Consider a few changes including: new cabinet knobs and hardware, a fresh coat of paint or stain for the cabinets, replacing a dripping faucet, updating a backsplash, or laying down new tile.

3. Add molding. A drab wall can be transformed in just minutes by adding crown molding. Molding adds flair to any room and it isn’t just used along the tops or bottoms of walls. Add molding in the middle of the wall, creating rectangular boxes to accent pictures or photographs. You can cut molding to size or ask your home store to do the work for you. Attach by using a pneumatic finish nailer — you can rent one from most home stores.

4. Order a sofa bed. Your office is your sanctuary, but you won’t be using it much around Christmas. In fact, it is the room that you plan to use as your guest quarters, but in its current condition it simply does not make the grade. Without a place to sleep what will you do? The most cost effective solution is to invest in a sleeper sofa, one that can be used as office furniture at other times. Moreover, office furniture is tax deductible; discuss with your accountant the best way to manage this. Oh, and be prepared to move in a chest of drawers and clear out a closet for storing and hanging clothes if your visitors will be staying with you beyond a few days.

5. Accessorize with care. No sleeping area is of much use beyond a bed if accessories are not included. Likely, you can find what you need elsewhere in the house and move these items to your guest quarters for the duration of their visit. Consider the following: a night light, a reading light, a waste basket, dried flowers, books, and wall hangings. No need to overdo it — just provide a few things to make your guests feel right at home.

Enjoy Your Guests

If you plan to paint your home, get the job done well before your guests arrive. Give your home time to “lose” its fresh paint smell, an odor that may bother some people. Above all, enjoy your guests and their Christmas visit, especially with your couch surfing dilemma solved.

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Categories: Home Renovation

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".