Things to Keep in Mind When Installing Air Conditioning in a Remodeled Home

Things to Keep in Mind When Installing Air Conditioning in a Remodeled Home
  • Opening Intro -

    Adding air conditioning to your home can increase the livability of it during the summer months.

    If your home is remodeled, though, installing AC can present a series of challenges.

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There may be size and space issues, existing venting, and restrictions on power usage that will affect your ability to install the air conditioning. However, this doesn’t mean that you can’t! With the proper tools and professional help, your remodeled home can have updated and efficient air flow.

Here are some of the things that you’ll need to keep in mind regarding these issues to properly install air conditioning into your remodeled home.

Space Concerns

A recently remodeled home means that you don’t want to tear into your walls in order to add venting for the air conditioner. There are options that will take your space concerns into account if you don’t have existing venting or if the current vents aren’t able to handle the load.

Mini-splits are popular because they can be mounted into any space and can help to maintain the temperature in that room. They also are more efficient because you only have to deal with the cooling of one space at a time.

Explore the options available for utilizing and circulating air in your space correctly.

Existing Venting

Older venting can be replaced or sealed so that your residential air conditioning can be more efficient. The sealing option tends to be a rubber-like spray that’s put into your existing system to seal off unused areas. This will allow you to upgrade your existing vents without having to disturb your newly remodeled walls.

Speaking with an expert will give you a good idea about the options that are available to you that don’t require the disruption of your whole home.

portable air conditionermni-split air conditioner

Power Restrictions

Another thing that will need to be taken into account is whether your electrical system can support the addition of an air conditioner. Many air conditioners need to be on their own circuits in order to not overload your electrical panel. You may need to look into other options that are compatible with the electrical uses of your home.

A smaller unit may work better if your electrical panel doesn’t have the room for an additional circuit. Alternatively, it may be easier to update your electrical wiring than your air conditioning. Speak to an expert about your options.

Required Usage

The type of unit that you should consider will depend on how you’re planning on using it. For example, a zoned system may work best if you only want to cool the upstairs of your home. In many cases, you can reuse your current venting system and have a baffle installed at your HVAC unit in order to get the most benefit out of your air conditioner. The square footage of your home will also need to be taken into account before you move forward with purchasing a zoned system.

other valuable tips:

There are air conditioning options that can be retrofitted to your home. Keep these things in mind if you want to install an air conditioner into your home without all the hassle, and without upsetting the appearance and style of your remodeled home.

Image credit: Pixabay

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Home Remodeling Reference:

SERVICES: air conditioning services

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Categories: Heating and Cooling

About Author

Brook Chaplan

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan