Bring in the Outdoors with an Elegant Conservatory

Bring in the Outdoors with an Elegant Conservatory
  • Opening Intro -

    Sunrooms can be used for one or more purposes including as an exercise room, a sitting area or as a breakfast nook.

    You can also use a conservatory for two or more purposes -- offering a living area as well as a place to showcase your indoor plants.

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Home renovation projects range from adding a deck to the rear of the house to converting an attached garage into an office or a bedroom. One option some homeowners choose to exercise is to build a conservatory. No, not a room for musical instruction, rather a room with a glass ceiling and glass walls, or what is sometimes called a sunroom. A conservatory can be used as a greenhouse, but is most likely used as a sunroom, and is typically attached to the rear or side of a house, but is sometimes built separate from the home’s structure.

Conservatory Essentials

Let’s take a look at four considerations of your conservatory sunroom, specifically one that is attached to your home:

1. Your conservatory sunroom should be placed on the side of the home that receives ample natural light. The idea here is to enjoy a touch of the outdoors especially on cooler days where sitting on a deck can bring on a chill. A sunroom should naturally heat up the room on clear days, and should not be obstructed by trees or other shading.

2. Sunrooms can be used for one or more purposes including as an exercise room, a sitting area or as a breakfast nook. You can also use a conservatory for two or more purposes — offering a living area as well as a place to showcase your indoor plants. In some larger homes a conservatory may encompass a pool, providing year ’round swimming that would otherwise not be possible.

3. The design of a true conservatory sunroom can mirror the classical architectural layouts and designs of English-style conservatories. Historic Victorian and majestic Georgian models with vaulted ceilings allow you to customize your room and feature a room addition that adds aesthetic appeal and value to your home. Aluminum structures can include real wood interiors or maintenance-free vinyl cladding. The glass that makes up the bulk of this structure allows the sunlight in, but keeps harmful UV rays out.

4. Working with an architect is wise. Although you can buy a conservatory kit and, if skilled, put this addition on your home yourself, you may want to consult with an architect first. There are structural considerations including the conservatory’s attachment to the house and to the foundation. Local zoning restrictions should be considered including the distance of your conservatory to neighboring property lines, electrical and heating lines, and roof compliance. An architect skilled in building conservatories can ensure that its design works with your home, enhancing its look without presenting an embarrassing detraction.

Conservatory Takeaways

The grander your home, the more elegant your conservatory sunroom will look. But even more simple homes can benefit from a customized design, adding visual appeal, personal enjoyment and resale value when completed.

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Categories: Sun Room

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".