What You Should Know About Replanting a Live Christmas Tree

What You Should Know About Replanting a Live Christmas Tree
  • Opening Intro -

    One of the most important decorations in many homes each December is the Christmas tree, which is usually a freshly cut fir tree or an artificial version of the same.

    Some people, however, choose a living tree --

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Live greenery for the home.

One of the most important decorations in many homes each December is the Christmas tree, which is usually a freshly cut fir tree or an artificial version of the same. Some people, however, choose a living tree — one that can be replanted once the holiday season is over. A live tree can provide much beauty and enjoyment for years to come, but only if you carefully transplant it when conditions are ideal and suitable for moving.

Select with care — The tree you select should be one that is able to make the transition from nursery to your home and out to your yard. You’ll want to work with a nursery to find the right tree for where you live and learn what must be done to make a successful transition from your home to your yard. Choose a healthy tree and be mindful that the tree is living and will react as it goes from a warm home out the bitter cold.

Find a location, dig your hole — You should dig the hole where your tree will reside now before the ground freezes advises Heather Rhoades writing for Garden Know How. Make sure that the tree is still wrapped in its root ball, which should be covered in burlap. Rhoades advises having the tree in your home briefly, perhaps 7 to 10 days at most before sending it outside to get acclimated to the cold.

Plant now or wait — When your living tree has finished its “work” inside, then transition to the outside by placing it in a cool room or sheltered outdoor area for 3-4 days. You’ll then want to plant it immediately. However, if you’re the midst of a bitter cold snap, then you should wait until temperatures moderate before transplanting your Christmas tree.The Washington State University extension service advises “‚Ķleaving it in the unheated room or garage for the duration of the cold spell, but continue to check its soil to make sure it doesn’t dry out.”

Consider renting a tree — Not everyone who buys a living tree will find transplanting a tree to be an enjoyable event. If you live in an apartment or prefer not to transplant a tree, but would still like to have the benefit of a live tree, then consider renting one for the season. Once your 7-10 day rental period has ended, the grower will retrieve your tree and plant it in a city park or other location where it is most needed. Inquire with your town, nursery or local gardening club if such a program is in operation in your area.

Cost & More

Live trees are generally smaller than cut and artificial trees and can run three times or more the price of a comparable cut tree. Harsh weather conditions can make it difficult for your tree to thrive, let alone survive. Consult with your nurseryman for the best place to put your tree and the care it will need.

See AlsoWhat Everyone Should Know About Poinsettias

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Categories: Landscaping

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".