Garage Door Security Problems (And What You Can Do About Them)

Garage Door Security Problems (And What You Can Do About Them)
  • Opening Intro -

    Garage doors including automatic systems are vulnerable to criminal mischief.

    Thieves know that if they can get inside your garage, they can get inside of your home.

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Automatic garage doors have been providing a convenient way for homeowners to get into their garages and enter their homes without stepping outside. No need to mess with a heavy, bulky door on rainy or icy days — a quick push of a door transmitter button makes it possible to open the garage and slip inside.

Garage doors including automatic systems are vulnerable to criminal mischief. Thieves know that if they can get inside your garage, they can get inside of your home. Read on and we will look at the common security problems automatic garage doors present and what you can do about them.

Home Security

1. Vulnerable windows. If you garage doors have windows, thieves can look inside, casing your home and planning their next step. Make it impossible for anyone to peer inside by picking up a can of frosted glass spray from your hardware store and spraying the windows. You will still enjoy the natural light, but without the unnatural eye inspection from would-be thieves.

2. Code grabbing. Thankfully, the problem of “code grabbing” has virtually disappeared. This phenomenon involved thieves that intercepted garage door codes and used this information in their own devices. Beginning in the mid-1990s, garage door manufacturers introduced random codes, numbers that changed each time you open the garage door. You are still prone to exposure if your system dates to before 1995. If so, you need to have the system updated to thwart thieves.

3. Nearby obstacles. Your garage door may be secure, but the surroundings may pose a problem. That’s especially so if you have tall or thick bushes on either side of the garage or trash cans positioned too close. You need to think like a criminal here — trim or remove overgrown bushes and move garbage and recycling cans elsewhere. As far as those tall, decorative pots go they’re going to have to be moved too.

4. Sufficient lighting. Every home should have security lighting and that lighting should automatically activate when an object is detected nearby. Install a light directly above the center of the garage with a sensor able to pick up the entire sweep of the driveway. When your car turns to enter the driveway at night, that light should come on. If adjusted properly and the light is not working, assume the worst: a prowler may have tampered with it and is waiting to slip into your garage as soon as you enter it. Stop, look around and call for assistance if your suspicions are raised.

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Other areas of garage vulnerability include the door connecting your garage to your home. That door should be secured with a deadbolt. Also consider the walkway door leading to the outside of your garage, if you have one. It might possibly be vulnerable to a kick in or its glass easily removed, making it possible for a thief to reach inside, turn the handle and enter your garage.

Lastly, always keep your car’s transmitter with you. If your car is stolen, you may find yourself dealing with another problem as car thieves become home burglars with the transmitter that was left behind.

See AlsoGarage Door Maintenance Tips for Homeowners

Home Remodeling reference:

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Categories: Garage

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".