All About Kitchenware

All About Kitchenware
  • Opening Intro -

    Whether you're replacing your kitchenware following a renovation or a general kitchen improvement, or you plan to keep your current wares, there is one thing you know: kitchenware is expensive.

    Hopefully, you have plenty of room to store all of your kitchen stuff, ensuring easy access and a long life for all of your goods.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) offers a broad definition for kitchenware, describing it as “food preparation and storage utensils.” That encompasses many things, therefore some specificity is needed to describe what kitchenware means to most homeowners today.

Eating utensils — You don’t eat utensils, but you certainly use these tools to enhance your dining pleasure. Standard eating utensils include a fork, a knife and a spoon. For more elaborate meals, you may also include a butter knife, a soup spoon and a dessert fork. You can go even further with this, however your kitchen must have enough room to hold each of these items. Stemware is a another sub-segment here and includes drinking glasses. One draw and one cabinet may not be enough to hold everything.

Food preparation utensils — Before you can eat, there are a number of food preparation utensils to have on hand. Literally, there are dozens of items found in today’s modern kitchens and these include a frying pan and cooking pots. You may also have on hand measuring cups, ladles, a strainer, a cheese grater, a can opener, mixing bowls, and various forks, spoons and knives. Your storage area is further tested by a number related utensils including scrapers, a meat thermometer, a colander, a strainer, a potato peeler, kitchen scissors, an herb chopper, funnels, a butcher block and cutting boards, just to name a few. Cookware sets alone can include 10, 12 more more items.

Serving food — You may serve some of your food directly from the stove to the table, but you also may use kitchenware to hold large portions of food that can be passed around the table. Such serveware includes serving bowls, platters, beverage dispensers and food bowls. These items can also include tiered buffet servers and specialty items such as a watermelon platter. Imagine the amount of room needed to store all of this stuff!

Storage items — Once you are done eating, chances are that you have leftovers to deal with. Have the entire family over for a major celebration such as Thanksgiving, Christmas or Easter and you’ll be reaching for the plastic containers including Tupperware and similar products to store everything in the refrigerator, on top of counters or on shelves. Containers that can be stored within other containers can save you much room. Avoid keeping leftover margarine containers and repurposing these — you’ll accumulate many more of them then what you need.

Of course, kitchenware isn’t the only space consumer. A crock pot, a toaster, one or more pieces of cooking equipment including a blender, and a coffeemaker require room too. We made no mention of your “good china” and special silverware that you bring out for important events. A dining room with a hutch and a server can help organize these seldom-used items.

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Categories: Kitchen and Dining

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".