How to Make a Small Area Appear Larger

How to Make a Small Area Appear Larger
  • Opening Intro -

    If you are working with a small living area, then you know about the challenges of trying to make your room useable.

    You may be able to expand the footprint of your home to gain more space, but this option is not possible if you rent or if you do not want to undertake the expense of an extensive upgrade.

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Making do with what you have is something interior designers have been making happen for years. Their services are sought after by city apartment dwellers and first time homeowners alike, people who simply must make good use of every square inch of living space or live without.

Let’s take a look at some ways you can make your small living area appear larger:

Use smaller furniture

— Some home furnishings overwhelm a room, making space appear to be smaller than it actually is. You can tackle this problem by getting rid of that 8-foot long sofa with raised arms and putting in its place a 6- or 7-inch couch with a minimalist design. Also, get rid of furniture you don’t need — decluttering opens up any room, making it appear larger than it really is.

Employ lighter, neutral colors

— Homes with large rooms are not restricted when bold or dark colors are used. However, these color schemes work against rooms that are smaller or tighter. Lighter, neutral colors give the appearance of more room and, when combined with less clutter can help make the claustrophobic person feel comfortable.

Remove excess wall hangings

— Homes that feature too many pieces of art can seem compressed. But, it may not be about the painting, rather the frame. Certainly, you don’t want to get rid of the heavy wooden frame that adorns a classical painting, but you can when the picture’s value is not dependent on how it is framed. Choose a thinner frame or consider using a lighter color.

Organize your kitchen

— Too much stuff on the countertops will make your already small kitchen seem oppressively tiny. Put away in cabinets what doesn’t have to be left out. Remove the leaf from the kitchen table, hang pots and pans from the ceiling and move the cat food bowl to a corner area.

Organize closets

— Chances are you aren’t utilizing your closet space in the best way possible. Firstly, get rid of anything you don’t need. Secondly, invest in a closet organizer system that will allow you to make use of dead areas. Gain more hanging space, enjoy new rows of shelving and create places to stash your Christmas decorations when the holiday season is over.

Build bookshelves

— Floor to ceiling bookshelves can hold all of your books and be used to house artwork, store supplies and free up needed area. Devote one wall in a room to a bookshelf unit and you’ll have a room that is organized, looks neater and is roomier.

Some other ways you can gain more room is to make your furniture do double duty. Footstools can include storage compartments and side tables can offer the same. Include an arrangement of fresh flowers and visitor attention will be on the colorful centerpiece which will also give your room a much needed boost.

Home Improvement reference:

view amazon bestsellers: room decor

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Categories: Home Decor

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".