All About Grubs

All About Grubs

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A few years ago while I was watering our new sod in the front yard, I kept noticing certain areas of our lawn turning brown. At first I was thinking that these brown areas were being over watered, so I stopped watering so frequently. That did not solve the problem. Then I thought that the urine from the neighborhood dogs was the cause for these brown areas to appear. That turned out not to be it either.

So, I began talking to other neighbors about these brown batches in my newly established sod. Some neighbors chimed in and said that my lawn may have a disease and I should take a soil sample and sent it in to the local laboratory to be tested. Then some others said that the lawn could have grubs. Grubs? What are grubs? Well, after my research my neighbors were exactly right, major parts of my lawn were invested with grubs. Here is what you need to know about these destructive insects.

What is a Grub?

A grub is a larvae stage of various beetles. These beetles include: European Chafers, Japanese beetles, and June bugs. They are white in appearance and typically are quite small about 1 to 3 centimeters in length.

Here is the typical life cycle of the grubs: beetles lay their eggs in the soil, the eggs hatch and grubs emerge. Eggs can hatch anytime from July to September.

They feed on grass roots and as the weather gets cooler, they bury themselves quite far down into the soil. They remain here until the weather gets warmer and then begin to feed on the grass roots in the spring. Then in early June, the grubs reach their pupal stage and new life cycle begins.

How I Check For an Infestation?

If you can pull back the lawn were the brown patch is, the roots clearly are not there anymore and more than likely the grubs infested this area. Another check to see if you have grubs is by digging a small area of your lawn and actually being able to see these annoying white grubs. If you can just count a handful, your lawn can be treated accordingly. However, if there are just too many to count there are certain measures which need to be taken so that the infestation does not spread to your entire lawn.

How Do I Treat for Grubs?

Once you realize that your lawn or part of your lawn has been infested by grubs, there are few options that you can take to prevent further damage to your grass. There are specific fertilizers and pesticides available to treat grubs, which are available at local home improvement stores. It is recommended that these treatments be applied to the lawn late Spring and once again in the Fall.

These time frames make sense due to the life cycle of the beetle. Not only that, but you can treat the adult beetles as well. If you notice beetles eating the leaves of your trees, shrubs or flowers, it is essential that you treat the adults as well. There are pesticides available to do this. If you treat adult beetles, then you are preventing them from laying their eggs, which ultimately means you are preventing grubs from emerging.

Ann Martin is a writer for Dinnerware Center, which has one of the largest collections of dinnerware styles and flatware sets, such as the Noritake and the Oneida Flatware sets. Ann is a freelance writer for other home-related websites. When Ann is not writing, she enjoys cooking and reading.

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Categories: Garden Maintenance

About Author

Ann Martin

Ann Martin is a freelance writer for Dinnerware Center, which is home to an extensive collection of dinnerware and flatware sets. Ann is a writer for other home and cooking websites. When Ann is not writing, she enjoys reading and spending time with her family.