How to Maximize Your Home’s Valuation

How to Maximize Your Home’s Valuation
  • Opening Intro -

    What is your home worth?

    An appraiser can give you a solid number, but that figure may not accurately reflect what your home would fetch if it was placed on the market today.

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Your appraiser may also look at your home from an entirely different perspective than your own, awarding you an increased value in one area, while dinging your home in another area. Read on for some tips on how to help your home achieve its maximum valuation.

1. Clean up your yard. Overgrown bushes, a sad looking flower bed and a sick lawn can ding your home’s value. Yes, curb appeal isn’t just what your real estate agent advocates, but your appraiser will notice it too and react accordingly. Trim the hedges, plant new flowers and reseed your lawn.

2. Look at your roof. A new roof won’t add value to your home, but an old roof will detract from your home’s worth. The same can be said for gutters, your HVAC system and the water heater. Yes, you may need to invest in repairs to maintain your home’s value or risk getting dinged for letting key items go to the wayside.

3. Make it work. A dripping faucet, a running toilet, a light fixture that is shot or any other item in your home that is not working can pull down the home’s value. These are small repairs, but one or more can have your appraiser concentrating on other faults to the detriment of your appraisal.

4. Employ special touches. A new brass knocker on the front door. An updated bathroom faucet. New shelving in the den. Updated kitchen hardware. Sometimes the small, but noticeable special touches can have a positive impact on your home’s appraisal. You don’t need to replace items for the sake of replacing, but you should consider what changes can increase any room’s appeal.

5. Remove the clutter. Too much furniture can make your home seem smaller. That’s why real estate agents tell sellers to stage their homes by removing old, bulky furniture in a bid to open the rooms up. Your appraiser should consider your square footage, but your cluttered space can have her drop your price resultantly.

6. What you just improved. Not every home improvement project will pay off, but if you recently replaced your kitchen appliances with stainless steel appliances, you should recoup that cost. Refinishing wood floors, replacing old carpeting and updating windows and doors are beneficial as well. A finished basement can give your home an edge over an unfinished cellar. A bonus is a basement with at least half a bath.

Valuation Considerations

Homeowners sometimes make the mistake of overvaluing their properties based on the recent sales of properties nearby. Simply because a home sold above its asking price does not mean that your home’s value should be inflated proportionately. It is worth what it is worth, at least in the eyes of an appraiser. Oh, yes, you can content your home’s appraisal, but by handling potential problems ahead of time you can save yourself time and money.

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Categories: Home Values

About Author

Matthew C. Keegan

Matt Keegan is a freelance writer and editor as well as publisher of "Auto Trends Magazine", an online publication. Matt covers campus, consumer, business and financial topics on various websites and weblogs, and has been published in the "Houston Chronicle", "Sam's Club Magazine" and "Wisconsin Golfer".